Reading for Battle

Battle Readings is a regularly updated compilation of articles, essays, and opinion pieces relevant to the themes of the Battle of Ideas.

Choose a theme from the listing on the left to narrow your search, or view all readings.

Economics

Basic Blue Skies Research in the UK: Are we losing out?
Science policy in the UK has given growing support for short-term goal-oriented scientific research projects, with pressure being applied on researchers to demonstrate the future application of their work. These policies carry the risk of restricting freedom, curbing research direction, and stifling rather than stimulating the creativity needed for scientific discovery.
Belinda Linden, Journal of Biomedical Discovery and Collaboration, 29 February 2008

Globalisation to enrich EU households
Globalisation has benefited Europe and could boost annual household income by a further €5,000 per family within a few years, according to a comprehensive survey of its effects.
Andrew Bounds, Financial Times, 28 February 2008

Creative Britain - New Talents for the New Economy
Creative Britain: New Talents for a New Economy is a strategy document for the Creative Industries: it documents 26 commitments, which outline how the Government will take action to support the creative industries.
DCMS, DCMS, February 2008

Will China and India conquer the world?
We should celebrate the spread of wealth and modernity in the developing world, while recognising that a great shift in global power is not imminent.
Stuart Simpson, spiked, 21 February 2008

Riding the Indian Tiger: Understanding India the World's Fastest Growing Market
Wal–Mart, GE, and Microsoft have all opened major operations in India, while Shell and General Motors have invested in about 3,000 new factories on the subcontinent. Why are these titanic companies pouring funds into a country known for its slow economic growth? Because today there is a new India.

William Nobrega & Ashish Sinha, John Wiley & Sons, 8 February 2008

Live Working or Die Fighting: How the Working Class Went Global
A Chinese woman pushes her way to the front of a hiring queue outside a factory in Shenzhen -- A Bolivian miner, without light or ventilation, crawls deep inside a deserted mine -- A group of Somali cleaners files into an investment bank in London's Canary Wharf -- Globalisation has created a whole new working class - and they are reliving stories that were first played out a century ago.

Paul Mason, Vintage, 7 February 2008

The Rise of the Dragon: Inward and Outward Investment in China in the Reform Period
Presents an accessible history of China as a trading entity, an overview of China's economic development over the last 30 years, and then focuses on China as a destination for inward investment, and as an outward investor, something that has only been happening in the last few years and is historically unprecedented.

Kerry Brown, Chandos Publishing (Oxford) Ltd, 1 February 2008

How Asia bails out America
The Federal Reserve’s ‘shock’ slashing of interest rates was only the latest episode in a drawn-out drama starring Western sluggishness and Eastern dynamism.
Daniel Ben Ami, spiked, 24 January 2008

The midwife of miserabilism
With its attacks on advertising, opulence and environmental filth, John Kenneth Galbraith’s The Affluent Society, published 50 years ago, anticipated today’s small-minded growth scepticism.
Daniel Ben-Ami, spiked, 9 January 2008

The truth about the ‘credit crunch’
What the Subprime Crisis reveals about the economy, politics and the state in 2008 – and why the real story is the rise of the East as the West flounders.
Phil Mullan, spiked, 7 January 2008


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