John Kampfner

John Kampfner was Editor of the New Statesman from 2005-2008. He was the British Society of Magazine Editors Current Affairs Editor of the Year in 2006.

John’s new book, on global wealth and its assault on democracy, has just been published by Simon & Schuster. His previous books include the critically acclaimed and best selling Blair’s Wars, an account of the former prime minister’s militaristic hubris.

John has presented several documentaries for BBC television and radio. In 2002 he won the Foreign Press Association award for Film of the Year and Journalist of the Year for his two-parter on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, called The Ugly War. His film War Spin, exposing the propaganda behind the rescue of Jessica Lynch, received considerable publicity in the US and UK.

John is a regular pundit for all channels on politics and foreign affairs.

He began his career as a foreign correspondent with the Daily Telegraph, first in East Berlin where he reported on the fall of the Wall and the unification of Germany, and then in Moscow at the time of the coup and the collapse of Soviet Communism. On returning to the UK in the mid-1990s, he became Chief Political Correspondent at the FT and political commentator for the BBC’s Today programme. Between 2002 and 2005, John was Political Editor of the New Statesman.

John is Chair of the board of Turner Contemporary, the most important visual arts project in the south east of England.

In 2008 John was appointed Chief Executive of Index on Censorship, one of the world’s leading organisations that monitors abuses of freedom of expression.

Related Sessions
Thursday 22 October 2009, 7.00pm Kowalsky Gallery, London
Publications

Freedom For Sale: how we made money and lost our liberty (Simon & Schuster, 2009)
Blair’s Wars (Free Press, 2004)


Festival Buzz
Particle Physics is Sexy

View: Particle Physics is Sexy

"It alerts me to new areas of debate, and gives thought-provoking new angles on topics I thought I already knew well. Altogether it's a wonderful intellectual tonic, which cheers up the dog days of November."
Ivan Hewett, music critic, Daily Telegraph